By Joseph Woods

Monsoon Diary

Between the birth of the poet’s daughter and the deaths of his parents, the poems in Monsoon Diary attempt to make sense of the world, from a mid-life flight from home en famille to new perspectives on both the past and the future.

Monsoon Diary strikes an often elegiac tone, betraying a growing awareness of mortality and the many losses that come with age. But it also bears witness to a country transitioning from dictatorship to democracy, finds the seeds of a new half-crown of sonnets in a line of Catullus, and, in Driving to Delvin, a poem of 84 couplets, breaks out into a kind of road movie of spirited and sometimes random association, bringing all of the book’s many themes and ideas, its fears and hopes, together in a celebration of forward motion, of living itself.

“A thoroughly delightful collection to delve into for individual favourites.”— Headstuff.org

 

Description

Between the birth of the poet’s daughter and the deaths of his parents, the poems in Monsoon Diary attempt to make sense of the world, from a mid-life flight from home en famille to new perspectives on both the past and the future.

Monsoon Diary strikes an often elegiac tone, betraying a growing awareness of mortality and the many losses that come with age.

But it also bears witness to a country transitioning from dictatorship to democracy, finds the seeds of a new half-crown of sonnets in a line of Catullus, and, in Driving to Delvin, a poem of 84 couplets, breaks out into a kind of road movie of spirited and sometimes random association, bringing all of the book’s many themes and ideas, its fears and hopes, together in a celebration of forward motion, of living itself.

“His voice is easy, melodic, seeming sometimes casual, sometimes deceptively smooth but always alert. If Woods is technically expert it is not to dazzle but to reveal his subject matter … his work taken as a whole shows an impressive reach
and range. …”
— Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

“The strength [of the poems] lies so much in their alert poise to the subtlest nuances of melancholy, nostalgia, present absorption and timeless epiphany.”
—Matthew Clegg, Staple

 

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Product Detail

  • ISBN: : 978-1-910251-35-5
  • Size: : 140 x 216 mm
  • Pages: : 80 approx
  • Published: : April 2018

About The Author

Author

JOSEPH WOODS is the award-winning author of three poetry collections. Sailing to Hokkaido (2001) won the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Award and, together with his second, Bearings, was reissued by Dedalus in a single volume entitled Cargo in 2010. His most recent, Ocean Letters (2011), has been translated into Hungarian and was awarded the Irodalmi Jelen Prize in 2013. A past recipient of the Patrick Kavanagh Award and of the Katherine and Patrick Kavanagh Fellowship, he was for many years Director of Poetry Ireland. Widely travelled, he lived in Japan in the early 1990s and has travelled extensively and often in Asia. He has edited various publications including, with Irene de Angelis, Our Shared Japan (Dedalus Press, 2007), an anthology exploring the influence of Japanese poetry and culture in general on Irish writing. He moved to Myanmar in the years leading up to democratic elections and now lives in Harare, Zimbabwe with his family. “A poet with the whole world in his hip-pocket.” — James J McAuley